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Facebook page dedicated to bullying Salina teens shut down

Published On: Mar 31 2014 05:55:48 PM CDT
Updated On: Mar 31 2014 06:17:24 PM CDT
SALINA, Kan. -

Shortly after being contacted by FactFinder 12 Investigators, Facebook has removed a page dedicated to bullying Salina teens.

Jennifer Ewing first learned about the page after her 14-year-old son came to her.

"He says there's a web page out there mom and they posted something out there that's not very nice," Ewing said.

After seeing it, she knew she had to act.

"It was hurtful, hateful, disgusting comments that were made," she said.

The page called "Salina Confession" was full of name calling, threats, and even words encouraging teens to kill themselves.

"This is why you read about kids who have hurt themselves because of something that was said," Ewing said.

Ewing and about two dozen others contacted Facebook asking the page be removed.

"Every response I got from Facebook said it wasn't harmful and they weren't going to remove it."

FactFinder 12 contacted Facebook and the page was removed about an hour later.

"I wish they would have done that based on the community comments," she said. "The moms in this area don't want to tolerate this."

But other pages will and already have been created.  So what do parents need to know?

"What may seem like a minor thing to you may seem very important to that child," says Terri Moses, Director of Safety Services with Wichita schools.

Salina school administrators declined an interview because it was a "student discipline" issue.  The district would not elaborate.

Moses says these kind of social media pages are common and the only solution is communication.  She says you have to talk to your children before they are ever a victim or take part in the bullying.

"Sit down and talk to your kid about what you've just heard. Talk to them about what's appropriate and what's not," says Moses.

She says parents also need to tell their children they can go to their teachers or counselors if they're not comfortable with telling their parents.

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